Record 31 Indian varsities in top world university rankings

iisc, iit, times ranking, THE ranking, iit bombay, iit madras, iit rankings, best university in the world, oxford university, best university in uk, best university in US, times higher education ranking, education news, indian expressApart from IISc, seven IITs holds position in the list including IIT-Bombay which is in 351-400 band

India has improved its position in the global higher education, with a record 31 educational institutions making it to a new list of the world’s top varsities topped by the University of Oxford.

The Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore is India’s top institution in the ‘Times Higher Education (THE) World University Rankings 2016-17′ list released yesterday, up nearly 50 places from its last year’s rank.

Only two Indian universities have made it to the top 400 universities’ list.

IISc (201-250 group), up from last year’s 251-300 group, is accompanied by the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Bombay (351-400 cohort) in the top 400 table.

There is no Indian university in the coveted top 200 list.

 

 

In this year’s rankings, there are four new entries — National Institute of Technology (Rourkela), Sri Venkateswara University, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research and Tezpur University.

The top 10 ranks are dominated by the UK and US universities. Apart from Oxford University, Cambridge University and Imperial College of London, seven are from the US with California Institute of Technology as the second best university in the world.

At number nine is ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich). Overall, 289 Asian universities from 24 countries make the list of 980 institutions.

“But the star of the region is India, which has 31 universities in the list. Its leading university – the Indian Institute of Science – is edging closer to the top 200, claiming a spot in the 201-250 band, its highest ever position and the country has four new entries in the top 800,” said Phil Baty, the editor of the THE World University Rankings.

India has 19 institutes in the top 800, two more than last year and 12 others in the 801-980 band.

 

The calculation of the THE World University Rankings is subject to an independent audit by professional services firm PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC).

The rankings claim to be the only global performance tables that judge research-intensive universities across all their core missions: teaching, research, knowledge transfer and international outlook. It uses 13 calibrated performance indicators to provide the most comprehensive and balanced comparisons, trusted by students, academics, university leaders, industry and governments.

Other Indian universities which have found a place in the list include Jadavpur University, Aligarh Muslim University, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, University of Calcutta, University of Delhi, IIT Guwahati, National Institute of Technology Rourkela, Panjab University, Savitribai Phule Pune University.

Sri Venkateswara University, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Tezpur University, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Amity University, Amrita University, Andhra University, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Manipal University, Osmania University, SASTRA University, Sathyabama University, SRM University, Vellore Institute of Technology have also made it to the list.

Yoga textbook created by Patanjali to be taught in Goa schools

Image result for Yoga textbook created by Patanjali to be taught in Goa schoolsPanaji: A yoga training textbook prepared by Baba Ramdev’s Patanjali Yog Peeth would be taught in the primary schools in Goa, a senior official said on Thursday.

“The (yoga training) scheme would be implemented by Goa Educational Development Corporation (GEDC) for a period of six years commencing from the ongoing academic year,” Director of Education GP Bhat told reporters.

The government also intends to constitute a state-level ‘yoga cell’ of yoga experts.

 “A healthy approach towards education and life can be developed right from a young age via the most powerful yogic practises. Yoga at primary level will definitely help develop an effective system to create healthy citizens for the nation,” Bhat said.

‘Khel-Khel Me’, a yoga training book based on NCERT syllabus and prepared by Patanjali Yog Peeth will be taught from std I to std IV.

The problems which school children face, such as stress, depression, lack of concentration, exam phobia, behavioural problems, relationship issues and drug addiction can be tackled through this course, Bhat said.

As per the scheme, 15 government primary schools in each tehsil will be selected for introducing yoga education. A teacher from each school will be selected as a trainer.

Choices and locking, colleges list and documents needed during counselling process

neet, neet counselling, neet exam, neet results, medical colleges list, neet locking, MBBS admissions, documents needed for neet counselling, neet news, education news, indian expressNEET 2016: The registration process, along with choice filling, locking, and seat allotment, will be completely online and will not require any documents.

This year, medical students have faced a lot of difficulties due to unexpected developments before the examination. Only a small percentage of aspirants were really well-prepared to make the cut in National Eligibility Entrance Test 2016.

If you have qualified NEET 2016, you have truly proven your mettle and deserve admission into the country’s best medical colleges. Though the first round of counselling is already over, here is a list of everything that you need to know about the counselling process if you are preparing to appear for the second round, this will help you make the best decision and lay a strong foundation for your professional career:

 

Exercising of choices and locking, second round: September 9 and September 10.
Process of seat allotment, second round: September 11
Result announcement, second round: September 12, 2016

Reporting at allotted medical/ dental college: Please note that this is strictly restricted to second round participants. It begins from September 13, 2016 and ends on September 20, 2016 at 5 pm. After the second round, vacant seats, if any, will be transferred to the state quota on September 20, 2016.
MBBS/ BDS session begins on September 30, 2016

Documents required: (September 9 to 12, 2016)
The registration process, along with choice filling, locking, and seat allotment, will be completely online and will not require any documents. Make sure you register before as the registration process concludes at 5 pm , 2016.

 

After allotment of your seat, you will be required to present the following documents while reporting to your allotted college:
NEET 2016 admit card
Result/rank letter issued by CBSE
Proof of date of birth (if not mentioned in the matriculation certificate)
Proof of identity
Class 10 certificate
10+2 Certificate
10+2 marksheet
8 passport-sized photographs (to be affixed on the application form)
Provisional allotment letter (to be generated online after allotment)
Migration certificate from the University/Board last attended by the candidate
One set of self attested copies of all the certificates. It is mandatory for all candidates to be physically present.

The candidate must also bring the following certificates, if applicable:
i. SC/ST/OBC certificate
ii. Orthopaedic Physical Disability Certificate

Top medical colleges to look for during you’re counselling apart from AIIMS:

Government MBBS colleges
i. AFMC, Pune
ii. JIPMER, Pondicherry
iii. Maulana azad medical college (M.A.M.C.) New Delhi
iv. Lady Hardinge medical college (L.H.M.C.) New Delhi
v. University college of medical sciences, New Delhi
vi. Grant medical college (G.M.C.) Mumbai
vii. Govt. Medical college (G.M.C.) Chandigarh
viii. Sawai Mansingh medical college (S.M.S.) Jaipur
ix. King George’s medical university (K.G.M.U.) Lucknow
x. IMS BHU, Varanasi
xi. Bangalore medical college and research institute (B.M.C.) Bangalore
xii. Seth G. S. Medical college, Mumbai
xiii. Topiwala National medical college Mumbai
xiv. Madras medical college (M.M.C.) Chennai
xv. Vardhman Mahavir medical college (V.M.M.C) New Delhi
xvi. Stanley medical college (S.M.C) Chennai

 

Private MBBS colleges
xvii. CMC, Vellore
xviii. Kasturba medical college, Manipal, Mangalore
xix. Christian medical college, Ludhiana

Tips to keep in mind during the counselling process

— Before appearing for counselling, consult your mentor/s as they have a good understanding of the overall process and can guide you to make the best selections based on your NEET ranking.

— Be aware of the opening and closing ranks for each and every college of your preference. Never choose a college whose closing rank is a lot less than the rank that you’ve obtained.

— Lock your preference order after careful assessment of your selections.

— Reporting at the designated college is vital to secure the desired seat. Make sure you have all your documents ready well in advance to avoid complications during this final phase.

— The counselling is a critical process that needs you to pay considerable attention to details in order to secure a seat in your desired medical college.

— A smart analysis of the counselling process can help you secure a seat, even despite scoring a relatively lower rank. Last year, out of the 3,429 available seats, a total of 875 seats were reverted to states as they were left vacant.

— You can enrol yourself in mock counselling sessions by various career counsellors to grasp a sound idea of the entire process.

With the major milestone of cracking the entrance examination reached, do not take the counselling session lightly, as it is the most decisive juncture in your journey to become a qualified medical practitioner.

IISc Bangalore remains India’s top university, global ranking drops

IISc Bangalore remains India's top university, global ranking drops

London: Even as the Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore remains the country’s top university, its global ranking has dropped two notches to 152 in the latest QS World University Rankings 2016-17 released on Tuesday.

Founded in 1909 as a result of the joint efforts of Jamsetji Nusserwanji Tata, the Government of India and the Maharaja of Mysore, IISc’s global ranking last year was 147 — also just within the top 150 universities in then world.

All the other Indian universities that make the cut within the top 400 on the list are the coveted Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) — Delhi (185), Bombay (219), Madras (249), Kanpur (302), Kharagpur (313) and Roorkee (399).

“This year’s rankings imply that levels of investment are determining who progresses and who regresses,” said Ben Sowter, head of research at QS.

“Institutions in countries that provide high levels of targeted funding, whether from endowments or from the public purse, are rising. On the other hand, some Western European nations making or proposing cuts to public research spending are losing ground to their US and Asian counterparts.”

The global rankings are:-

1: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2: Stanford University

3: Harvard University

4: University of Cambridge

5: California Institute of Technology

6: University of Oxford

7: University College of London

8: ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology)

9: Imperial College, London

10: University of Chicago.

IBPS clerk exam 2016: Check exam pattern

IBPS, IBPS clerk, IBPS clerk exam 2016, ibps cwe clerk, IBPS CWE Clerks VI exam, IBPS CWE Clerks VI exam 2016, ibps clerk exam result, how to prepare for IBPS CWE Clerks VI exam, tips IBPS Clerks exam

IBPS CWE Clerks VI exam: The Institute of Banking Personnel Selection (IBPS) is going to conduct the IBPS clerk exam 2016 through the Common Recruitment Process (CWE Clerk VI) from November 26, 2016 onwards. The process will have two stages — online exam (preliminary) and online exam (main). The provisional allotment of candidates is expected to happen in April 2017.

Over 19,000 vacancies have been released this time around. As a candidate, you can expect stiff competition from other aspirants who also wish to embark upon a career in public sector banking. Thus, it is best to understand the exam pattern and prepare yourself accordingly.

Stage – I (online exam: preliminary)

The preliminary exam will be computer-based where objective type questions of 100 marks will be asked. It will have to be completed in one hour. The exam will have three sections and the following breakup:

Numerical ability – 35 questions and 35 marks
English language – 30 questions and 30 marks
Reasoning ability – 35 questions and 35 marks

Please note that one hour is the composite time duration allotted to complete this exam. No section-wise time limit is applicable.

Stage – II (online exam: main)

The main exam will also be computer-based. It will be a 200 mark exam divided into five sections. Each section will have a separate time limit. Once the time limit for a particular section is over, you will not be able to go back to that section again. The breakup of marks and time limit allotted to the 5 sections are as follows:

Reasoning – 40 questions and 50 marks (Time: 30 minutes)
English language – 40 questions and 40 marks (Time: 30 minutes)
Quantitative aptitude – 40 questions and 50 marks (Time: 30 minutes)
General awareness – 40 questions and 40 marks (Time: 25 minutes)
Computer knowledge – 40 questions and 20 marks (Time: 20 minutes)

View: PHOTOS: Top government jobs to apply in 2016

Here, it is important to understand that there is differential marking scheme. Not all the questions have the same weightage. Quant and reasoning questions carry 1.25 marks each whereas each computer knowledge question carries only .5 marks.

IBPS Clerk exam preparation tips

 

 

Things you need to keep in mind
(I) In order to get shortlisted for the main exam, you have to attain a sufficiently high overall score.
(II) In addition to the overall score, you must clear the sectional cut-offs for all the sections.
(III) For each incorrect answer, 25 per cent marks allocated to that question will be deducted from your aggregate score.
(IV) All the sections, except English language can be attempted in either English or Hindi.

 

Noteworthy points – exam pattern

— The numerical ability / quantitative aptitude section will be primarily focused on arithmetic, data interpretation and algebra. Calculation based questions will be there in ample number.

— English language section will mainly test you on reading, grammatical and word usage skills. To crack this section, effective reading ability and strong vocabulary are needed.

— General awareness section will have questions from Banking GK and current affairs. Important national and international developments of the last six months comprise the current affairs portion.

— Reasoning ability questions can be a little time consuming. Sitting arrangement, syllogisms, series, ranking test, direction test, coding-decoding, puzzle test, mathematical inequalities, input-output and blood relations are the topics to be covered.

— Computer knowledge section will comprise areas such as : Computer hardware, computer terminology and abbreviations, internet knowledge and protocols, evolution of computer systems and programming languages, basics of networking, commonly used software packages like MS Office, cyber security, et al.

Having understood the IBPS clerk exam pattern in detail, you should now get down to preparing for it systematically. With systematic approach and right amount of hard work, this exam can be definitely cracked. So, go ahead and give it your best shot.

IBPS clerk exam 2016 Preparation tips and tricks

IBPS, IBPS clerk, IBPS clerk exam 2016, ibps cwe clerk, IBPS CWE Clerks VI exam, IBPS CWE Clerks VI exam 2016, ibps clerk exam result, how to prepare for IBPS CWE Clerks VI exam, tips IBPS Clerks examWith systematic approach and right amount of hard work, this exam can be definitely cracked

IBPS CWE Clerks VI exam: The Institute of Banking Personnel Selection (IBPS) is going to conduct the IBPS clerk exam 2016 through the Common Recruitment Process (CWE Clerk VI) from November 26, 2016 onwards. The process will have two stages — online exam (preliminary) and online exam (main). The provisional allotment of candidates is expected to happen in April 2017.

Over 19,000 vacancies have been released this time around. As a candidate, you can expect stiff competition from other aspirants who also wish to embark upon a career in public sector banking. Thus, it is best to understand the exam pattern and prepare yourself accordingly.

Stage – I (online exam: preliminary)

The preliminary exam will be computer-based where objective type questions of 100 marks will be asked. It will have to be completed in one hour. The exam will have three sections and the following breakup:

Numerical ability – 35 questions and 35 marks
English language – 30 questions and 30 marks
Reasoning ability – 35 questions and 35 marks

Please note that one hour is the composite time duration allotted to complete this exam. No section-wise time limit is applicable.

Stage – II (online exam: main)

The main exam will also be computer-based. It will be a 200 mark exam divided into five sections. Each section will have a separate time limit. Once the time limit for a particular section is over, you will not be able to go back to that section again. The breakup of marks and time limit allotted to the 5 sections are as follows:

Reasoning – 40 questions and 50 marks (Time: 30 minutes)
English language – 40 questions and 40 marks (Time: 30 minutes)
Quantitative aptitude – 40 questions and 50 marks (Time: 30 minutes)
General awareness – 40 questions and 40 marks (Time: 25 minutes)
Computer knowledge – 40 questions and 20 marks (Time: 20 minutes)

View: PHOTOS: Top government jobs to apply in 2016

Here, it is important to understand that there is differential marking scheme. Not all the questions have the same weightage. Quant and reasoning questions carry 1.25 marks each whereas each computer knowledge question carries only .5 marks.

IBPS Clerk exam preparation tips

 

 

Things you need to keep in mind
(I) In order to get shortlisted for the main exam, you have to attain a sufficiently high overall score.
(II) In addition to the overall score, you must clear the sectional cut-offs for all the sections.
(III) For each incorrect answer, 25 per cent marks allocated to that question will be deducted from your aggregate score.
(IV) All the sections, except English language can be attempted in either English or Hindi.

 

Noteworthy points – exam pattern

— The numerical ability / quantitative aptitude section will be primarily focused on arithmetic, data interpretation and algebra. Calculation based questions will be there in ample number.

— English language section will mainly test you on reading, grammatical and word usage skills. To crack this section, effective reading ability and strong vocabulary are needed.

— General awareness section will have questions from Banking GK and current affairs. Important national and international developments of the last six months comprise the current affairs portion.

— Reasoning ability questions can be a little time consuming. Sitting arrangement, syllogisms, series, ranking test, direction test, coding-decoding, puzzle test, mathematical inequalities, input-output and blood relations are the topics to be covered.

— Computer knowledge section will comprise areas such as : Computer hardware, computer terminology and abbreviations, internet knowledge and protocols, evolution of computer systems and programming languages, basics of networking, commonly used software packages like MS Office, cyber security, et al.

Having understood the IBPS clerk exam pattern in detail, you should now get down to preparing for it systematically. With systematic approach and right amount of hard work, this exam can be definitely cracked. So, go ahead and give it your best shot.

5 Best Practices to Prepare for JEE Exam

jee-mainYou have always dreamt about studying in one of the elite IITs but for that, you will have to crack one of the most competitive exams out there – the JEE. It is a myth that an average student cannot nail this exam or one has to be a genius to get into an IIT. If you are hard working and a good strategist, then you have a high chance of cracking the JEE Main 2016.

Self Study Vs Coaching Classes

If you have enough will power and can discipline yourself to study every day, and have cleared, more or less every doubt then give coaching classes a miss. But, if you think that you need a constant push and need to clarify your doubts, and also have the financial resources to join a coaching centre, then coaching classes might be the right fit for you. Keep it in mind that coaching classes are a waste of time if you just go there to mingle with a friend. Ironically, these very friends will benefit you indirectly in the form of peer pressure. It is all about using the resources you have at hand at the end of the day.

ABCD of the Syllabus

Make sure that you know the entire syllabus thoroughly because if you have not gone through it carefully, you might miss important things and give more priority to less important ones. The entire syllabus may appear to you, as vast but do not let that discourage you. You can easily tackle all of it if you study systematically and from the very beginning. Make a timbale and stick to it. You can allocate time for the least favourite subject either at the end of the day or at the very beginning when you start studying. To compensate for your dislike, study something you like on the next day.

Practice and Revise Innumerable Times

Solve as many papers as you can. This will not only teach you how to manage your time but also make you realise which areas need work and which you can afford to tackle later. Practice does make a man perfect and once you have a fair idea about your strengths and weaknesses after solving multiple question papers, the final exam will almost be a cakewalk for you. Revise everything that you learn at least five to six times otherwise there is a chance that you might not be able to retain it all for the D-day. There are various techniques that you can try out, which will help you to remember things. Flash cards and notes will help you to keep track of the entire syllabus.

Take Help

You should take the help of everyone starting from your family members to your teachers at school. Not all of them will be able to help you solve those papers but their valuable advice will definitely hep you. Now, if you are one of those who decide to give coaching a miss, you can always seek help from IITians themselves or from people who have attempted this exam in the past. Thanks to the internet, today you have various online forums where you can post doubts and your query swill immediately be addressed by others who are giving the exams and if you are lucky, an IITian himself/herself might solve them.

Positive Attitude

For any competitive exam, you need have a positive attitude otherwise; the pressure will get to you and will create obstacles in your way of becoming an IITian. You are giving one of the toughest exams in your life but remember that although it might be tough, but it is not impossible. On days when you doubt yourself, talk to your well-wishers or indulge a hobby as it will surely lighten your mood and make you focus better on your studies. With the right attitude and hard work, there is no reason why you would not be able to do well in the JEE Main and JEE Advanced.

CBSE issues guidelines to schools on singing national anthem

CBSE issues guidelines to schools on singing national anthem

CHANDIGARH: CBSE has asked schools to sing the national anthem in proper manner and sing it as stated in the constitution of India. Board has given guidelines on how to sing the anthem including time duration in which the national anthem is to be sung.

In a recent circular the Central Board of Secondary Education stated that ” in its framework of the values education lists the Article 51(A) of the Indian Constitution- Fundamental Duties that contains 10 principles and the first one is “to abide by the constitution and respect its ideals and institutions, the national flag and the national anthem. The board has framed four behavioral descriptors for students for this principle. The second descriptor entails singing of national anthem with decorum.”

In a further link in the circular the board has given the wordings of the full version of the anthem and its playing time which is approximately 52 seconds. “A short version consisting of the first and last lines of the national anthem is also played on certain occasions,” it stated.

Playing time of the short version is about 20 seconds. Board has further defined occasions on which the full versions or the short version will be played.

The full version of the anthem shall be played on the following occasions including “civil and military investitures, national salute, during parades, on arrival of the President at formal state functions, When the national flag is brought on parade, when the regimental colours are presented etc.

The full version of the anthem must be played accompanied by mass singing on the unfurling of the national flag, on cultural occasions or ceremonial functions other than parades and on arrival of the President at any government or public function, the instructions read.

In all schools, the day’s work may begin with community singing of the anthem. School authorities should make adequate provision in their programmes for popularizing the singing of the anthem and promoting respect for the national flag among students.

Ofsted warns of ‘squalid’ illegal schools

michael wilshaw
Image captionSir Michael Wilshaw says there needs to be more urgency in closing unregistered schools

Ofsted is warning that pupils are being taught in “squalid” schools that are unregistered and unsupervised.

But Ofsted chief Sir Michael Wilshaw says the process to close such schools is “inadequate”.

Where there is such “illegal activity”, he says, the “full force of the law” should be brought to bear.

Sir Michael has written to the education secretary to say 15 such schools have been found and they should be “registered or closed down”.

He says there are “serious concerns” about the safety of children being taught in these “so-called schools”.

In response, Education Secretary Nicky Morgan says the government has taken “robust steps to tackle unregistered schools and improve safeguarding”.

“However we agree with Sir Michael that more needs to be done.”

As such Mrs Morgan says there are plans for “further powers to regulate settings which teach children intensively and to intervene and impose sanctions where there are safety or welfare concerns. We will be consulting on these proposals shortly”.

‘Deeply troubling’

The Ofsted chief says inspectors visited 28 institutions where there were concerns and found 15 unregistered schools.

The schools that are still operating have not been identified, although some are believed to be in Birmingham and London. They include some linked to faith groups.

Nicky Morgan
Image captionNicky Morgan says there are plans for further powers to intervene where there are safety concerns

These are schools providing at least 20 hours a week of lessons, operating outside the supervision of the Department for Education, local authorities or Ofsted inspections.

Ofsted accuses the operators of some of these institutions of “using the freedoms afforded to genuine home educators as a cover for their activities”.

But Sir Michael is calling on the education secretary for greater urgency in closing unregistered schools and in the response of councils and the Department for Education.

And he warns against “bureaucracy, legislation or lack of resources” being used as a “reason for inaction”.

In one “deeply troubling case”, Ofsted says inspectors had to return for a fifth visit to Bordesley independent school in Birmingham, which inspectors now believe has closed.

Sir Michael says inspectors had been delayed from entering, but once inside had found “squalid conditions, including three single mattresses covered in filthy sheets in one room and no running water in the toilet areas”.

‘Significant risk’

There was also “clear evidence of segregation, with separate classrooms for boys and girls” and “no evidence of appropriate vetting checks being carried out on staff”.

Inspectors also warned of “pupils being taught a narrow curriculum that was failing to prepare them for life in modern Britain”.

Sir Michael’s letter says there were subsequent questions about rights of access for the local authority – and as such “I arranged for police officers from the West Midlands force to accompany inspectors to facilitate entry to the premises”.

Mrs Morgan said: “We understand Bordesley has now closed and are keeping in close contact with Birmingham local authority as they work to urgently ensure the children involved are safe and are receiving suitable education.”

The Ofsted chief has told the education secretary: “The arrangements for closing down unregistered schools are inadequate.

“Too many children remain at significant risk of harm. I will continue to do all that I can to identify and inspect unregistered schools.”

Labour’s shadow education secretary, Lucy Powell, said: “It is hard to fathom why arrangements for closing down unregistered schools remain inadequate and swift action on this issue has not been taken.

“With children at risk of being exposed to harm, exploitation or undue influences, more inertia from this government simply isn’t good enough.”

Ms Powell warned of a “dangerous void” in the local oversight of schools.

Poor quality profs? Blame ghostwritten PhD theses

Poor quality profs? Blame ghostwritten PhD theses

A doctoral degree is usually associated with years of re search that goes into a thesis -a crucial part of attaining a PhD. However, obtaining a doctorate tag has become less difficult due to an increasing number of student-researchers using ghostwriters to do the thesis work for them.

Experts say outsourcing thesis writing is not exactly a new phenomenon but it is important to understand why it is flourishing and the negative impact it has on academia. They say many teachers at professional colleges with PhDs, some even from prestigious universities, have poor language and communication skills. They may know the subject but do not know how to explain concepts -not having had to while producing a doctoral thesis.

Apar t from external agencies that provide help to write dissertations, faculty members of colleges often play ghostwriter too. Several candidates approach English or communication professors to pen their theses, the going rate for which is between `1 lakh and `2 lakh and even more, the professor of a reputed educational group said.

Former Anna University professor V Chandrasekhar, who admits that doctoral candidates have approached him to write their theses, says many teachers in various institutions struggle to speak or write English. “It has become a lucrative business, with some people charging large sums. But even money does not ensure quality . Many theses are full of grammatical errors or wrongly constructed sentences,” he said.

Sometimes, students are involved in the process indirectly. A science student of Ethiraj College says students do projects related to the thesis of teachers so the material they prepare contributes to teachers’ dissertations.”Usually, a student is given the option of choosing their topics. But sometimes, when they approach the teacher for suggestions on topic options, the teacher will suggest ideas that are part of a thesis that he is working on,” she says.

The demand for PhD holders to fill teaching positions in universities and colleges is fuelling the need for doctoral degrees and contributing directly to the increase in ghostwritten dissertations. The number of candidates who secured PhDs in the state was around 1,000 a year one decade ago; it has now increased fivefold, professors say .

Prof Manivannan of the RMK Group of institutions says faculty members in several colleges, especially in rural areas, lack communication skills. “This leads to outsourcing of dissertations,” he says. “Language skills are one aspect, but many candidates are also not ready to put in the work that goes into writing a PhD thesis.”

Former AICTE chairman and retired IIT-Madras director R Natarajan says there are only a few PhD holders of true quality today .

“A lot of fraudulent activities are taking place,” he says. “Many people take shortcuts to obtain a PhD rather than go through the rigour required. Many have a tendency to take shortcuts for everything. This ultimately reflects the standard of education.”